Apr 19, 2017 11:14 AM EDT By Charlie Monforte

'Planet Earth II' documentary series in Ultra HD Blu-ray footages just sets the future of television

"Planet Earth II" nature documentary series was produced in Ultra HD Blu-ray technology, setting a new standard of TV.

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"Planet Earth II" documentary series in Ultra HD Blu-ray footages has set a newest quality picture standard of TV as it has just been hailed as the future of television.

When the the nature documentary series was made in Ultra HD Blu-ray technology it means it is 4 times color resolute in pixels than the ordinary nascent Blu-ray format that "Planet Earth II" used to have in 2007.

The nature series has thus 4K/HDR/wide color presentation, giving it a picture quality, a more lifelike images in stunning colors, clarity and resoluteness that people have never seen ever before on television.

Ultra Blu-ray pictures are 4K images on the UHD Blu-ray, and with it, one can watch the animal fur, feathers or the flora of nature's creatures and locations like perfect showcases in so colorful, dramatic clarity and resoluteness.

"Planet Earth II" was shown by BBC early this year, but BBC released the series on home video in March 31 in Ultra HD Blu-ray discs at $60/£40 asking price.

"Planet Earth II" is a five-hour six-part documentary series with dramatic storylines focused on six different environments: islands, jungles, mountains, deserts, grasslands and cities. It has close-up and action-packed footages.

Hans Zimmer provided the best musical score while David Attenborough did the excellent narration. It was out via BBC Worldwide in the US last March 28 and in Europe last March 13.

When the series was shown on BBC it was in 4K Blu-ray in 50 or 60 frames than in 24fps. There were some occasional judders during camera pans that the viewers' TV's motion processing might not have a capability to remove them cleanly, that had given distractions, according to the review of John Archer of Forbes.

The showing was fine on BBC iPlayer 4k. But with its astonishing spectrum of fine detail, with 2160 lines of resolution instead of the HD standard of 1080, the use of HDR (short for High Dynamic Range) of UHD TVs and discs henceforth gives a challenge to TV manufacturers to adjust and innovate with the Ultra Blu-Ray picture standard and the high color and high dynamic range technology of "Planet Earth II".

(HollywoodZeitgeist/YouTube)

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