Amy Winehouse Death Caused By Bulimia Her Brother Says

With the opening of Amy Winehouse's exhibition at the London Jewish Museum approaching, in remembrance of what would of been her 30th birthday, her brother Alex Winehouse revealed what he believes really caused her death.

"She suffered from bulimia very badly," he told The Guardian in a June 22 interview. "That's not, like, a revelation--you knew just by looking at her. She would have died eventually, the way she was going, but what really killed her was the bulimia."

However, in January 2013, it was confirmed that the cause of Winehouse's death was alcohol poisoning, Rolling Stone reported. The singer died on July 23, 2011 at the age of 27.

"I think that it left her weaker and more susceptible," he said of the eating disorder she developed at the age of 17. "Had she not had an eating disorder, she would have been physically stronger."

Her brother also revealed a kind side to his troubled sister.

"She was loyal--as a sister, daughter and friend," he said in the interview. "She was probably the most loyal friend to people I've ever known." 

Although she had a short career, with her debut album released in 2003, Winehouse had a memorable one. Her sophomore album Back To Black is currently the best-selling album of the 21st century in the U.K.

"All she wanted to be was a singer and have a good career and that was it really," her brother said.

Her London exhibit, called Amy Winehouse: A Family Potrait, will open on July 3 and run until Sept. 15. It will be curated by her brother and the singer's sister-in-law. The exhibit will showcase Winehouse's Jewish heritage as well as her family life with the inclusion of childhood photos. It will also feature some of her items of clothing. 

As Enstars reported, a documentary about the late singer is also in the works. It will be directed by Asif Kapadia.

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